Disappearing 9 patches reappear! 

Reappear in my life anyway, however briefly.

It’s such a simple pattern but I think it’s so pretty! Of course you can mix up a disappearing 9 patch block (D9P) to look haphazard and interesting, but I think my eyes like order.

The last time I made one of these (2014!) I did a tutorial on how to make it using 2 charm packs, and also showed different layouts that you could do. Here is the link to the tutorial:

https://cuckooblue.co.uk/2014/06/22/the-nine-patch-disappears-tutorial-and/

I used Fig Tree fabrics for that too, slightly less “summery” ones maybe. Here’s a picture of that one if you’re interested:

Can you see the difference? Apart from the colours, I literally used eighty 5″ squares (2 charm packs) and had none left to make a couple of borders to make it symmetrical. This time I did, as I used leftovers from various recent projects, including my Fig Tree Twirl quilt.

It makes a difference doesn’t it? You can see I just made a strip of 2.5″ print squares joined alternately to 2.5″ x 5″ white rectanglesand joined it to the side of the quilt top I’d made (from the tutorial). And then made another and joined it to the bottom. You need 15 2.5″ print squares and 16 2.5″x 5″ white rectangles. And then I put a 2.5″ wide wide border round the outside. The quilt then finished at 58.5″ rather than 52″ which is a nice size. When I was putting the binding on I reflected that adding another 2.5″ print border next to the white border would be lovely – if I make another that’s what I’ll do!

I used a charm pack of Coney Island by Fig Tree & Co for Moda, and leftover charm squares, mainly from Strawberry Fields Revisited and “Fig and Plum” – now a very old line. It all works though.

Oops, I nearly forgot about the back. It’s a charity quilt, and I wanted to keep it simple, and not too expensive. It’s brighter and less “classic” than the front, but I thought the recipients might appreciate a change, depending on their tastes and decor:

I don’t know if you can see the quilting well, but I did loops, leaves and flowers, fairly loosely (because my batting lets me and I’m on a deadline, so needed to be quick). I’ve been waiting for 3 months for a batting roll – I knew it would take that long as it’s quilters dream orient which needs ordering – I think it’s so expensive that it’s not that popular here. But it is glorious stuff and my favourite. Anyway it arrived – yay! And I’m ready to quilt ALL the things!

This quilt is destined for one of the survivors of the Grenfell Tower tragedy in London a few weeks ago. I’m going to try not to write about it here (as I get so angry about how politics and cost-cutting is costing lives, you can read about the tragedy online if you like) but most people in the UK have been in deep shock about it. Quilters, being generally kind people, being no exception. Mx Ruby Rouge on Instagram started a quilt drive to try and provide quilts for people who have lost everything – sending a physical hug, telling people that we care. There is now a hard working team of people who have organised drop off points, couriers, wadding and fabric donations, long arm quilters working for free, all kinds of things across the country. The number of shops who have donated is amazing. It makes my head explode at the logistics and the kindness, but it looks as though 1000 quilts have been donated or pledged. Including my small offering. You can see more on Instagram under the hashtag #quiltsforgrenfell but the whole thing has been organised through a closed Facebook group. It’s heartwarming. And devastatingly tragic.

Anyway enough! It’s the school summer holidays so I must leave my online hideaway of creative folk and prettiness.

Until the next time,

Poppy xx

Magic Paintbox Quilt – Curved Piecing (and Drunkard’s Path tutorial)

Omigosh. I’ve wanted to make this quilt for years. Then I started and had doubts. Then I continued and had doubts. Then I sewed it together and I LOOOOVE it!

It’s a drunkards path quilt. I’ve loved these pieced circles for so long, but I firstly I was concerned about cutting all those curves and secondly about sewing all those curves! Turns out there was really no need to worry.

This was the first set of blocks I sewed. The template is great; I got it from Amazon but it’s made by Silesian Quilt and fits 5″ charm squares. You can get both pieces out of one charm square, or two of the convex pieces, which is very useful if you only want circles from your printed charm squares like I did! The individual block is 4.5″ when made up (4″ when sewn into the quilt). I got myself a 28″ rotary cutter to cut the curves – really easy. A normal 45″ wouldn’t fit into the curves and I didn’t want to use scissors (although you can of course!).

I got lots of advice on Instagram about how to sew these without pins but having tried I personally prefer using 2-3 pins. A lot better than the 5 pins I started with! It’s not as difficult or as slow as you’d think. These are the few tips I have:

1. Mark the centres of the convex and concave curves by folding the shapes in half and finger pressing to make a mark.

2. Like this:

3. Line up the marks, wrong sides together and put a pin in the centre:


4. Line up the top edge of the curve. Unlike any of the tutorials I’ve seen, I found my curves fitted better and lay flat when I matched the first part of the curve and not the top straight edges. This means there is a little triangle of background fabric showing as below. It looks weird, but works for me – the two edges look straight in the end.

5. Pin the top and bottom. You might not need to bother with three (or any) pins, I just like it better this way.

6. Sew curve, matching edges and sweeping any bunched-up fabric out of the way. I made a video of me doing one, it’s not brilliant, I know you’ll find better on the web, but it might help reassure you that these curves are not a problem. You might think it’s slow going, but this video is 36 seconds. That means, including pinning, you can do each block in about a minute, once you get into your stride. Not bad for a “difficult” block!

These were my first nine and I wasn’t sure. They seemed garish, too low contrast… Just not as beautiful as I’d envisaged. The ever-supportive Instagram crowd, however, said they were the bees knees, so I persisted. I tried to create better contrast thereafter – at the time I was a lot happier with them, although now I think I was probably fussing over nothing!

That’s my box of “uncut scraps” – i.e. not cut into strips or squares, which I do with some of my scraps. I used scraps because I wanted to test out whether I liked sewing curves and didn’t want to cut up fat quarters in case I abandoned it. I adore the scrappiness though… I wasn’t sure at first – but I think all the low volume fabrics calm down the crazy brights.

Well a bit.

I didn’t need to use any pattern, I made the blocks with the templates, sewed them together and trimmed them to 7.5″ square.

After that I just joined them together, made an inner and outer border of 2.5″ wide low volume scraps and middle border of 2.5″ wide bright prints and that was really that. The quilt finished at 58″ square.

I used my favourite Quilters Dream Orient batting. I’ve been using Sew Simple light 100% cotton for a while, as I’d bought a half board of it, and whilst I liked it, I’d forgotten how soft and silky Dream Orient is, and how lovely it is to quilt with. And Quilters Dream Select cotton is not far behind the Orient. It is heavier than the Sew Simple light though and is heavier than my leaves quilt which is bigger. That suits me, but it pays to pick your batting to match your needs. The quilting shows up nicely too and it’s a huge bonus that you can quilt 8″ apart.

See that middle block? With the glasses and dresses? That’s my favourite of the whole quilt. It’s somehow really delicious. I quilted it with loops/”bubbles” to mimic the circles theme.

Ahhh. I’ve no idea what to do with this quilt as I kind of accidentally fell into making it, but I do really like it. Thanks to the cheerleaders on Instagram for making me stick with it when I was ready to make it into a cushion! I need to remember that the final quilt is always much nicer than the individual blocks.

And on that note I’ll love you and leave you.

Till the next time,

Poppy

Xxx

 

P.s. If you fancy making your own or even a few blocks for a pillow and didn’t want to buy an acrylic template, this Moda Bakeshop tutorial has a template for 5″ charm squares that you can cut it in cardboard or template plastic! The pictures are not working for me on the site, but at the bottom it says “printer friendly version” – click it and it opens a PDF showing all the pictures and the template. Have fun!

http://www.modabakeshop.com/2012/09/dancing-daisies-a-drunkards-path-quilt.html

Figgy Leafy Twirling Goodness!

It’s late spring here in Scotland – daisies, birdsong, yellow fields full of rapeseed flowers and even sunshine. No place for Autumn leaves? Oh, I think we could make allowances.

I can’t tell you how much I love this quilt! The pattern is Twirl by Fig Tree and Co. It’s charm pack and jelly roll friendly and I’ve never seen one I didn’t like. I think it’s the curling twirling stems which make it. For such a simple quilt pattern, it’s really pretty!

This is made with a variety of Fig Tree & Co fabrics from different collections including Honeysweet, Tapestry, Somerset, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Farmhouse, Strawberry Fields Revisited, Butterscotch and Rose and my new favourite, Chestnut Street. Many were charms and mini charms left over from my Fig Tree EPP hexagon quilt top (which is finished by the very way! Another story for another day) –  but this quilt looks equally as good using just one collection or other fabrics. In fact it was seeing the beautiful version made by my friend @sewbernice on Instagram which made me finally move this quilt to the top of the “To Make” list!

I did add a few extra yellows from Riley Blake’s Vintage Daydream collection as in the picture above. I love a bit of yellow in quilts – in this particular quilt it makes me think of Autumn sun on these softly falling leaves.

I borrowed my mum’s spare bed to see what it looks like on a double bed as mine’s a king sized. And my room’s much messier! I shortened this quilt from the original pattern – it should be 4 leaves across by 5 leaves down, which would have made it fit the bed nicely. I had wanted it as a lap quilt (it’s approx 64″ ) but I think I’ll sleep under it in the summer. I probably shouldn’t have shortened the pattern after all. I’m a titch though, so it’s all good.

I used one of my favourite ever fabrics on the back – Budquette in Nightfall by Bari J. I had 4 metres stashed away, and much as it was painful to use it all up, I love that I will get to see it all the time. I love the back just as much as the front! It’s difficult to use precious fabrics, and expensive to make backs from designer fabrics, but when it’s a quilt you are going to use, it’s worth it – you pretty much end up with a reversible quilt.

I used Sew Simple light 100% cotton batting, which is scrimless – you have to quilt it at least 4″ apart which means fairly dense quilting, but even so it is snuggly and drapes really well. Batting matters! I did an allover loopy leafy pattern with Superior Threads So Fine! Thread in the top and Bottom Line in the bobbin, which gives a nice fine quilting line on both sides. I’m certainly into this thread combination at the moment, and my machine likes it, but I’m not done with experimenting. No wonder quilting is an expensive hobby. So many options!

Right, I’m off to snuggle a new quilt. Hope Spring is bringing you all much joy and creativity, my friends.

Till the next time, Poppy xxx

P.S. you can buy the downloadable Twirl pattern here if you like:

store.figtreeandcompany.com/Downloadable_Twirl_by_Fig_Tree_Co_p

Charity sewing!

It’s a wonderful thing to sew for family and friends – especially children. The pleasure of knowing that someone loves you enough to make something for you shows all over their face when you gift something handmade. And that feels good. But it’s another level of feel-good to know that your handmade gift is not only going to someone for whom it’s a wonderful luxury, but to someone who has probably never had someone spend lots of time and money on making something for them. Especially a child.

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This one is going to the incredibly worthwhile UK charity called Sibling Together, which sets up fun summer camps for children who have been separated by the UK foster system to bond again. I just can’t imagine. Children who have had such a tough start in life that they end up in foster care is hard enough to imagine – but to be separated from their siblings? Presumably, after all they went through together? Tough times. I imagine some need the totally new start, but for some it is because foster homes can take one but not 2 or 3 children. My heart breaks just thinking about it.

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Anyway, at the end of the camp they gift a quilt to each child to go home with . Apparently they really treasure the quilts, presumably as a reminder of their sibling and their experience, but it’s a blanket isn’t it? Something comforting about a blanket. And this one is certainly bright and cheerful!

The back – Ikea’s perfect Nummer fabric.

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I made this using a tutorial by the effervescently wonderful Jenny Doan of the Missouri Star Quilt Company, and is called the Double Square Star quilt. It’s pretty quick, it’s easy and it’s fun. I made it smaller than hers by using 16 blocks so it finished at 58″ x 63″ (it was square, but I trimmed the side borders so I didn’t have to piece the backing which was 60″!). Jenny shows you a block at a time, but it is easy to chain piece so long as you lay all your fabric out in piles beforehand, and it really was quicker than I had imagined. The tutorial is here if you fancy a go!

http://blog.missouriquiltco.com/double-square-star-quilt/

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I used 3 charm packs of “Bread n Butter ” by American Jane for Moda. I was so excited to use it, and I love the collection, but once I made a few blocks as above, I was regretting it. It was all too bold and primary coloured with the big blocks – just not me at all. In fact it was meant to be a gift for my friend with whom I used to work and who was retiring (and turned 60) but it just didn’t feel like her either. I liked it more once I put a big 5″ border around the outside, but was still not feeling the love; I needed to wait until I found the right recipient. After all, a quilt top is expensive, but finishing it is also expensive – far too much to be sitting around!

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But it was all the lovely folk on IG that made me recognise that my tastes are totally different as a 40-cough year old than they were as a 20 year old, and the idea of this one being my Siblings Together quilt this year was born. And suddenly I really liked it – it was like I could see who it was for and I got enthusiasm for it again. I quilted it with flowers and leaves and it transformed it in my eyes. I now think it’s great! Hurray! I think there’s a lesson in there somewhere.

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I really really hope that some wee person will like this quilt, maybe even grow to love it over the years. God knows, these children could do with some serious amounts of love. I’m so glad there are people like Siblings Together doing so much good in a harsh world. And so glad that I can contribute in some small way!

This is their website; they are on Facebook too.

http://siblingstogether.co.uk/

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Poor long-suffering quilt-holding hubster. I made him come to the entrance of the forest opposite our house and everything, just to take these pictures, so I’d better use them. I’m sure the neighbours laugh at us. True love that.

Enjoy the Spring my friends. Until the next time,

Poppy xx

PS. I’m doing tons of sewing which I just don’t have time to blog about – you can see it on my Instagram under “Cuckooblue” if you like – there is a link on the sidebar of this blog is you need it! Thank you so much for stopping by!

 

Use all the scraps! Using cut-off geese or binding triangles

I don’t know about you but I hate to waste fabric. So pretty; to sweep it into the bin feels sacrilegious. For a change I’m not even exaggerating. So when I’m making flying geese, those tiny triangles left over make me sad. “Use me,” they say. “Give me life and purpose, that I might bring joy to this world .” They haunt my dreams. Okay so now I am exaggerating. So with some of the leftovers of a recent quilt, I made a block:

I think it’s called a bow tie block; it’s certainly not my invention anyway! Each square finishes at 2″ – these triangles were left over from making geese with 2.5″ squares. I know this isn’t going to set the world on fire but – Hurray for a use for the geese off-cuts!

I know there are other things you can do – with my fancy fox quilt of a few posts back I did an extra line of stitching before cutting them off and made tiny HSTs… Never used them! I might still use them but it actually slowed down my working a lot; I’m not sure if I’ll do it again unless they were a lot bigger.

Anyway, you may well not need a tutorial but for anyone who would like one, here goes with a quick picture demo:

You need: 2.5″ background squares and triangles cut off from making geese or binding. Seams are 1/4″ throughout.

1.Lay triangle on top of the 2.5″ background square, RST as below. You want to ensure that when you sew and fold it back, the resulting triangle is bigger than the background square corner. Other than that it doesn’t matter where you place it. These are going to be wonky bow ties!

2. Here I’m just folding it back to check out will be bigger than my background square before I sew it.

3. Sew 1/4″ away from the triangle’s diagonal

4. Fold back the triangle and finger press (or use an iron)

5. Flip it over and trim the excess fabric with scissors (or your rotary cutter)

6. Finished and cute!

7. Repeat on the other side

…And sew together – make sure your white background stripes are all going in the same direction.

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An 8.5″ block. I’m thinking if I alternate them with blocks made from 2.5″ squares or 4.5″ squares I could actually make something fairly big from them? Or I could just keep collecting my geese triangles and keep going.

Anyway, an uncharacteristically un-wordy post today, I’m off. Hopefully next time I can show you which quilt needed all those flying geese!

Till the next time, Poppy xx

Scrappy Plus Sign Quilt (- and tutorial)

Gosh – first of all, Happy New Year! I hope this year is a happy and creative one for you all. I’ve been really slack at blogging last year, but I am keeping up regularly on Instagram, so do come and say hello on there if you are an Instagrammer!

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Now and then though, I feel the need for more words than you can put on Instagram, and this quilt calls for one of those times. It isn’t my design, in fact a lot of folk have made a “Low Volume Plus Quilt” before, but since I changed the measurements from what you can find on google to be charm pack friendly, I thought I would include those measurements here.

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I completely love this quilt! The design was first devised by the amazing Ashley of Filminthefridge.com , who took one of the borders of Alexia Abegg’s “Marcelle Medallion” quilt and made it into a quilt all on its beautiful own. You can see hers here; it is a slightly different pattern to mine and different measurements, but a similar effect:

http://filminthefridge.com/2013/04/02/marcelle-plus-quilt/

A scrappy low volume quilt has been on my radar for a few years now; but I realised  that in doing so many fairs and commissions, I had accumulated a great stash, but had had no time to do any of the selfish sewing I had wanted to for a while… suddenly 2016 felt like the right time to try some of those long-awaited projects. Just before Christmas and New Year. Well, the muse strikes when she strikes!

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I had accumulated some low volume fabrics (fabrics which read as neutral or almost white) for the background, but in order to keep it really scrappy looking, I started with a couple of Moda charm packs of a great low volume line – Zen Chic’s Modern Backgrounds Paper. I then topped up with all kinds of low volume fabrics from stash and scraps, including lots of leftover charm squares from other projects. Because of that I had to choose measurements which were as charm pack friendly as possible, and decided on this block:

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Excuse the terrible image! I made it on Word, but then couldn’t work out how to save it as a jpg to insert – ended up taking a photo of it. I’m not going to win any awards for tech any time soon!

Obviously for the bright crosses, you can’t use charm squares – unless I guess you used  five 2.5″ squares of the same colour and increase the scrappiness! That would look cool too.

It’s such an easy block – there are no seams to match, and it is all extremely forgiving. You can likely work it out from the diagram above, but just in case you would like some basic directions for a 50″ x 60″ quilt, here goes:

You will need: 

30 different printed fabrics, size 2.5″ x 11″

120 low volume fabrics, size 2.5″ square (or 30   5″ charm squares, cut into 2.5″ squares)

120 low volume fabrics, cut into 4.5″ squares.

I liked making mine as individual blocks, so that’s how I will describe it, but obviously you could chain piece them all if you like. Sew using 1/4″ seam throughout.

  1. First cut your printed fabric strip into one 6.5″ x 2.5″ piece and two 2.5″ squares.
  2.  Sew a low volume 2.5″ square to each of the printed 2.5″ squares, and both ends of the printed rectangle.20161129_171907
  3. Sew the 4.5″ low volume squares in rows as the  diagram or the photo below:20161129_181342
  4. ~Ta-da! Easy-peasy. The block should measure 10.5″ square and will finish in your quilt at 10″ square. 20161129_184356
  5. Make 30 of these blocks and then sew them into a 5 x 6 grid as shown in the “I’ve just been basted” photo below: 20170105_165253

It goes together so quickly and I loved making those blocks! And I have a new-found obsession with low volume fabrics; me and any new found fabric obsessions are not a good combination for my wallet.. I might need to start doing commissions again! I batted it with my favourite Quilter’s Dream Orient batting – an all-natural blend of silk , cotton, tencel and bamboo that quilts, feels and drapes beautifully and quilted it with some free-motion loops, daisies and leaves. I’m going to have to show you some photos:

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And OH MY. Look at that backing. It’s my current favourite print – a grey/navy floral from Tilda’s Memory Lane collection. It is a definite indulgence, but I’m so happy to have a whole quilt back with it. I love the back almost as much as the front! Because the back is so dark, I didn’t want the thread to be too visible in the bobbin. So I used The Bottom Line thread in white by Libby Lehrman for Superior threads – it is a 60wt polyester which has given a beautiful subtle quilting line in my print, not too obvious in the navy but keeping the pink flowers fresh and clean. In the top thread I used one of my favourite cotton threads – Konfetti 50wt Egyptian cotton thread by Wonderfil which doesn’t break in my machine unlike, sadly, Aurifil does. And a size 70 topstitch needle. Thread can make such a difference to a quilt – especially when you don’t want to detract from the prints or busy up the design too much. So important – but I do agonise over it sometimes!

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I’m off to snuggle it, and hopefully also  the wearer of those battered old shoes which you can see below that quilt! Wishing you all a wonderful 2017.

Until the next time, Poppy xx

Fancy Foxes in Liberty!

Elizabeth Hartmann of http://www.OhFransson.com is a genius. Everyone knows it, but really, until you make her Fancy Fox quilt (or another of her patterns I assume), you don’t really appreciate it.

It really is a great pattern. Simple to piece using basic techniques, fun and cute, and the fox face is beautifully realised. She gives you all the cutting instructions and fabric requirements – and it all seemed to work out exactly as she said. I chose to make the original fancy fox pattern (there is a larger/giant block too with a different pattern) which you can get as an immediate pdf download here in her shop:

http://ohfransson.bigcartel.com/product/fancy-fox-quilts-pdf-quilt-pattern

It started with a friend of mine who fell in love with the fancy fox quilt but wanted me to make it alongside her. She sent me a gazillion pictures of Fancy Fox quilts, all of which I resisted, until finally I saw one in beautiful Liberty of London Tana lawn fabrics and I suddenly saw potential. I cut all my background fabric, noses and eyes, made these 4 with her, and then stopped for months as life took over. My friend decided not to go ahead with her project so no longer needed me to make them with her (she’s dyslexic), and these little foxes lay forgotten.

And then the lovely Michelle of http://www.coleandtaffy.com decided she wanted to make a Liberty fancy fox quilt, at a gentle 2 or 3 foxes a week, and we decided to sew along together on Instagram (she is @coleandtaffy and incredibly talented!). Soon we had others joining us, and my little foxes started multiplying, really without much fuss at all.

I have never sewn projects in this way – a kind of gentle, back-burner way. Usually I start, finish and end a project before starting another;somehow that makes me sew on some kind of self imposed deadline, like preparing for battle. I didn’t know I sewed like that until I sewed along with Michelle, who seems to have multiple projects on the go at all times. It felt like a very mindful way to sew. I would have chain pieced them all and had it done within a week had I been left to my own devices, but there was something very conscious and satisfying about sewing each fox individually. I even gave them names.

Meet Heather, Heather, Heather and Veronica:

10 points for getting the 90s film reference!

By midway, I started to think about some sort of colourwash layout. By this time, Michelle and a few other IG friends were not only cheering me on but had donated pieces of Liberty for my quilt and it was all starting to feel rather special.

One thing I would say is that at first my 1/4″ seam allowance was a little too scant, and it affected how much overlap there was in the background fabric under the chin (there was too little). This meant some of the noses would get blunted in the seam allowance when I sewed it together – so watch your seam alllowance very carefully! I bought myself a gadget, Liberty fabrics being too expensive to get wrong:

This is a seam guide called “seams sew easy” by Lori Holt and it’s genius. The only issue is you have to reposition it each time you replace the bobbin, but it’s still worth it. Not only did it resolve my seam allowance issue, but it meant I didn’t have to draw a diagonal line on the squares for the flying geese on the fancy fox block …or any other blocks where you sew a diagonal – snowballs, geese etc. HSTs are going to be much quicker now…

Anyway, suddenly I was done! Obviously the kind of suddenly that happens over months. Not really suddenly at all.

My background fabric was a grey cotton chambray for softness, and the cheek fabric was a white lawn cotton, to try and retain the sofness from the Liberty lawn fabric. I used kona black for the eyes and noses as I figured they’d be too small to really affect the softness… So I chose Quilter Dream Orient batting, with its scrimlessmix of silk, bamboo, tencel and cotton because it’s so soft with a beautiful drape and I splashed out on a Liberty back, an aqua daisy print called Bellis.

I really pondered the quilting. It seemed to me that lots of people in blogland had sent theirs out to a longarm quilter and gone for a woodgrain pattern. I knew I would never do that design justice, but I liked the idea of woodland. So I quilted a loopy leafy allover design using wonderfil invisifil thread – very fine polyester that I hoped wouldn’t show up too much on the very contrasting background and cheeks. The effect was good; subtle quilting without it being invisible thread but it kept snapping in my machine! Eventually by changing to a bigger needle, I just about got through. I’d really like to try it again for the effect but I’m reluctant to go through that again.. I don’t know why my machine didn’t like it! Annoyingly it doesn’t like Aurifil thread either…

Some pictures… because obviously I haven’t included enough!

Can you see the leaves? Kiddo says they are all baby foxes peeking out from their nest in a bush. He loves this quilt because it’s very soft and very snuggly, even before the first wash. And because ..foxes.

Hello Kitty Liberty! So cute. Why does every piece of Liberty just feel so special?

Aw my lovely Liberty foxes! The lap quilt comes out about 60″ x 52″ ish and is a really fun make. It looks good in most fabrics , so long as you ensure a high contrast between the cheek, eye/nose and background fabrics, And it’s actually pretty economical for prints – each fox face uses a  5″ x 9″ or 2.5″ x 18″ piece of printed fabric) I can imagine doing this lap quilt with half a jelly roll or half a layer cake  . I’m so tempted to buy the giant size pattern now – I don’t think I’m done with these foxes yet.

Meanwhile, I’m off to snuggle some very fancy foxes! Until the next time,

Poppy xx