Figgy Leafy Twirling Goodness!

It’s late spring here in Scotland – daisies, birdsong, yellow fields full of rapeseed flowers and even sunshine. No place for Autumn leaves? Oh, I think we could make allowances.

I can’t tell you how much I love this quilt! The pattern is Twirl by Fig Tree and Co. It’s charm pack and jelly roll friendly and I’ve never seen one I didn’t like. I think it’s the curling twirling stems which make it. For such a simple quilt pattern, it’s really pretty!

This is made with a variety of Fig Tree & Co fabrics from different collections including Honeysweet, Tapestry, Somerset, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Farmhouse, Strawberry Fields Revisited, Butterscotch and Rose and my new favourite, Chestnut Street. Many were charms and mini charms left over from my Fig Tree EPP hexagon quilt top (which is finished by the very way! Another story for another day) – ┬ábut this quilt looks equally as good using just one collection or other fabrics. In fact it was seeing the beautiful version made by my friend @sewbernice on Instagram which made me finally move this quilt to the top of the “To Make” list!

I did add a few extra yellows from Riley Blake’s Vintage Daydream collection as in the picture above. I love a bit of yellow in quilts – in this particular quilt it makes me think of Autumn sun on these softly falling leaves.

I borrowed my mum’s spare bed to see what it looks like on a double bed as mine’s a king sized. And my room’s much messier! I shortened this quilt from the original pattern – it should be 4 leaves across by 5 leaves down, which would have made it fit the bed nicely. I had wanted it as a lap quilt (it’s approx 64″ ) but I think I’ll sleep under it in the summer. I probably shouldn’t have shortened the pattern after all. I’m a titch though, so it’s all good.

I used one of my favourite ever fabrics on the back – Budquette in Nightfall by Bari J. I had 4 metres stashed away, and much as it was painful to use it all up, I love that I will get to see it all the time. I love the back just as much as the front! It’s difficult to use precious fabrics, and expensive to make backs from designer fabrics, but when it’s a quilt you are going to use, it’s worth it – you pretty much end up with a reversible quilt.

I used Sew Simple light 100% cotton batting, which is scrimless – you have to quilt it at least 4″ apart which means fairly dense quilting, but even so it is snuggly and drapes really well. Batting matters! I did an allover loopy leafy pattern with Superior Threads So Fine! Thread in the top and Bottom Line in the bobbin, which gives a nice fine quilting line on both sides. I’m certainly into this thread combination at the moment, and my machine likes it, but I’m not done with experimenting. No wonder quilting is an expensive hobby. So many options!

Right, I’m off to snuggle a new quilt. Hope Spring is bringing you all much joy and creativity, my friends.

Till the next time, Poppy xxx

P.S. you can buy the downloadable Twirl pattern here if you like:

store.figtreeandcompany.com/Downloadable_Twirl_by_Fig_Tree_Co_p

Use all the scraps! Using cut-off geese or binding triangles

I don’t know about you but I hate to waste fabric. So pretty; to sweep it into the bin feels sacrilegious. For a change I’m not even exaggerating. So when I’m making flying geese, those tiny triangles left over make me sad. “Use me,” they say. “Give me life and purpose, that I might bring joy to this world .” They haunt my dreams. Okay so now I am exaggerating. So with some of the leftovers of a recent quilt, I made a block:

I think it’s called a bow tie block; it’s certainly not my invention anyway! Each square finishes at 2″ – these triangles were left over from making geese with 2.5″ squares. I know this isn’t going to set the world on fire but – Hurray for a use for the geese off-cuts!

I know there are other things you can do – with my fancy fox quilt of a few posts back I did an extra line of stitching before cutting them off and made tiny HSTs… Never used them! I might still use them but it actually slowed down my working a lot; I’m not sure if I’ll do it again unless they were a lot bigger.

Anyway, you may well not need a tutorial but for anyone who would like one, here goes with a quick picture demo:

You need: 2.5″ background squares and triangles cut off from making geese or binding. Seams are 1/4″ throughout.

1.Lay triangle on top of the 2.5″ background square, RST as below. You want to ensure that when you sew and fold it back, the resulting triangle is bigger than the background square corner. Other than that it doesn’t matter where you place it. These are going to be wonky bow ties!

2. Here I’m just folding it back to check out will be bigger than my background square before I sew it.

3. Sew 1/4″ away from the triangle’s diagonal

4. Fold back the triangle and finger press (or use an iron)

5. Flip it over and trim the excess fabric with scissors (or your rotary cutter)

6. Finished and cute!

7. Repeat on the other side

…And sew together – make sure your white background stripes are all going in the same direction.

wp-image-96929715jpg.jpg

An 8.5″ block. I’m thinking if I alternate them with blocks made from 2.5″ squares or 4.5″ squares I could actually make something fairly big from them? Or I could just keep collecting my geese triangles and keep going.

Anyway, an uncharacteristically un-wordy post today, I’m off. Hopefully next time I can show you which quilt needed all those flying geese!

Till the next time, Poppy xx